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Day 5 - Sly rips the neck out of our final day's worth of Questions!!!

Hey folks, Harry here... Tonight (Thursday) at midnight you can begin to start seeing RAMBO - With it - you'll start to form all new questions, which you'll have to hold and keep in mind till the next Stallone feature - which frankly can't come soon enough. Here ya go with the final set of questios this go around. Let's all think Sly for the Q&A and well - he doesn't need our hopes for a good weekend - RAMBO is amazing and it'll kick ass this weekend. Here ya go...

1. Between the two immortal characters you have portrayed, which is your favorite and why? I am a huge fan of both of them. Scott P Brookings, South Dakota
1.) That’s a tough question. One really taps into the philosophical side, which is Rocky, and that character can speak freely and it’s a very rare situation when your alter ego can be exposed like that. I’ll never have that experience again. Imagine being able to inhabit a character for thirty years. It’s a freak occurrence. So he would be my favorite, but Rambo taps into something I believe all men harbor inside, which is a sense of indignation and isolation that usually has to be resolved through physical endeavors but in the end there is no satisfaction because the price that is paid is too intense and destructive. So Rambo is destined to live his life in solitude.
2. What is your opinion of current studio action movies? from Alec in Los Angeles
2.) Technically the ability to visually create situations that were unthinkable twenty years ago is a wonder to behold. But, there is a lack of humanity when technology is that sophisticated. However, every generation is defined by the art it creates so I guess the present day action films are in tune with the youth of today.
3. What was it like working with a Russian director, Andrei Konchalovsky, on Tango and Cash? What do you think of the result? andrejgontcharov berlin/moscow
3.) Andrei was a real gentleman and I thought his take on “Tango and Cash” was very good and would’ve been infinitely more realistic had he been allowed to continue. His replacement was more attuned to comic pop culture so the film had a dramatic shift into a more light hearted direction.
4. Mr. Stallone, My buddy outright refuses to watch the upcoming RAMBO... he sees absolutely no reason to do so. Even the trailer did nothing for him. Mind you, he doesn't like violence (it doesn't worry me as I'm desensitized to movie violence), and the trailer did focus on that aspect of it. He happily watched ROCKY BALBOA ('cos he's a fan of the series -- and well, who isn't? -- not to mention that it just plain ruled!) but he has no interest in this... which I find strange since John Rambo (in First Blood, anyway) is just as, if not more, interesting than any of the characters you've portrayed (equal with Sheriff Freddy Heflin, I reckon). So, please explain why he should go see this! If anyone can sway him, it'll be you... Callum Miramar, Wellington
4.) I believe this Rambo is by far the most responsible action film I’ve ever done since “First Blood”. The content is mature and the word “violence” is being used in the wrong context. It’s a film about survival of a peaceful persecuted group of people in Burma. It’s about clashing ideals of missionaries who believe God can make all persecution go away through love and the counter force of confronting evil with bravery and a force of righteousness that people can rise up and slay tyrants if they’re willing to put their life on the line. I love this film and I believe if people go to the theatre they’ll be pleasantly surprised by it’s many layers.
5. Hi Sly, Will Rambo be your last all out action film? Jeremy Lorence Edison, NJ
5.) I love action films. I think they’re highly underrated and it’s unfortunate that the amount of effort and craftsmanship that goes into creating modern day mythology is considered light weight fare. It’s not. It’s a thousand times more difficult to do a profound action film than a dramatic film, but I know the consensus of so called dramatic purists would disagree. So to answer your question I would consider it a privilege to do more films in this genre.
6. I'm a Viet Nam vet Sly, and I'm so glad you are back! A gazillion of us vets love John Rambo and identify very much with his feelings and wish we could do what he does. How did it feel to make him live again? Do YOU like him and what did if feel like playing him again after all these years? Lots of us wish we were movie stars like you, or heroes like John. You ARE a movie star and get to play a great reluctant hero like Rambo. In your fantasies, would you ever wish to be someone like him? Why, or why not, and if not, in your heroic fantasies, who would you be? Not a question, but a very pretty lady friend of mine asked me most excitedly, "Did you see they are making another Rambo movie?" And before I could answer I knew all about it she said "Stallone looks older, but Damn does he look hot!!" As a tottaly hetero male, all I could say is "No shit!" Thanks for bringing John back Sly. Damn, I missed his bad ass self!! Dan McLaughlin Federal Way, Wa. Viet Nam Vet, 1969
6.) It’s a privilege to play a character like John Rambo because he’s the composite of all the brave, incredibly heroic military men that performed gallantly for their country and never received the honors that should be bestowed on them. I am thrilled that he is back because he’s a complex character that is trying to make sense of the world and truly understand how he fits in. We don’t give a lot of our warriors the kind of credit they deserve but when they’re asked to sacrifice their life so others may live there can be no more noble character.
7. Of course like everyone else massive Rocky fans, cant wait for John Rambo. With typecasting always a problem with bringing back Characters such as Rocky and Rambo (although they are very much loved). The better action films have been very much character driven with great directors bringing out the best in the actors they work with (ie Copland). Are there directors that you would actively lobby to work with like Quentin Tarantino (I'd love to see you in one of his), David Fincher, Stephen Soderburgh or James Cameron. Daniel Ogle
7.) Of course I’d love to work with all of these men but it seems my fate has taken me in a different direction. Perhaps I may have been more aggressive early on in seeking them out or directing myself when I had more opportunities. Today it seems I’m most likely to focus on directing my projects because it’s so hard to wait around and hope opportunity will knock on your door. So like it or not I suppose I’m stuck with me.
8. What was it like being with Brigitte Neilsen? Just looking at her scares the crap out of me - in a strangely erotic way. Did she intimidate you? Was she nicer in person than she seemed on the screen? Thanks - Chad G. (US Air Force, stationed at RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom)
8.) This is a perfect example of how you can prove to yourself that you’re constantly in a state of metamorphosis. When I look at Brigitte Neilson and her exploits, it’s as though I’m looking at a movie by Ed Wood. It’s as though I’m having an out of body experience and all I can think is we were brain dead in the 80’s because today I can’t even conceive of that happening. We were never meant for each other. I remember on my honeymoon that I was daydreaming the mattress would open up and swallow me and I would escape this nightmare. I don’t blame her for anything. I blame myself for entertaining a temporary form of insanity.
9. Hi Sylvester, Lots of respect for your work as well as endurance in the business, that’s for you and the boys of AICN. These Q&A’s show a great deal and respect all around. I have been fascinated with SE Asia for years, and although I lived in Taiwan, I never got a chance to travel there. As such, I was really digging when I saw Burma, as the locale and instigation for the movie. As you must know it’s been a hellspot forever and only recently covered in the world press, for a second…I think choosing this country and it’s situation is very important and thoughtful on your part, unless you were just spinning a table globe…in which case, niiiice. Anyways, can you please elaborate on using this country in the movie, and if and how the experience has changed you; if it has will you do anything ‘political' about it. It’s a fucked up situation and people are getting away with murder. Movies are movies, but simply mentioning the country works towards awareness. Ps I’m doing health work in Guatemala, and either you or Arnold could be Jean-Claude’s running mate in a Presidential landslide in any Latin American country. Fotis
9.) I thought if this were to be the last Rambo I would hope it would serve two masters. The first, would be to provide escapism in the form of an adventure film. The second, which is by far the most important, is shedding light on a horrible depraved situation where murder, torture, rape and mutilation are an every day occurrence. If there was ever hell on earth, it would be called Burma. So depicting the atrocities, which are historically accurate in the film in the way the Burmese are systematically butchering a peaceful group of peasants called the Karen would provide a window into that part of the world for the uninformed. The Burmese military spends billions of dollars every year in Washington D.C. hiring publicity firms to completely distort the ongoing genocide, so this is the only way I can assist them and it’s a privilege to do so.
10. Hey Sly. Can you explain the story behind Rambo's wrist watch? Normeristi
10.) I’m not exactly sure how to answer this but an old military watch made by Panerai is used. It’s not in circulation and it’s anodized casing is the type that Rambo would use. So I thought why not have him wear something that is old and authentic, reflective of who he is. I just want to thank Harry and all of you wonderful movie patrons who really provide an interesting insight into a world far beyond Hollywood. As much as you may welcome these questions I welcome your insight and your commitment to the art of filmmaking, so thank you very much for your time. It is appreciated and hopefully our relationship will continue. Best of Life, Sly.

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